Tag Archives: FSA

Fluid Sealing Association Releases Latest “Compression Packing Technical Manual”

The Fluid Sealing Association (FSA) has released the fourth edition of the “Compression Packing Technical Manual.” This update represents a four-year intensive joint effort of FSA and the European Sealing Association’s (ESA) compression packing technical committee’s new technical learnings. These learnings can help inform end users on industry best practices and performance characteristics of compression packings.

New sections to the manual have been added including:
- environmental controls
- compression packing vs. mechanical seals – leakage rates
- pump packing power consumption
- determining stuffing box dimensions

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Unusual Mechanical Seal Applications

There are applications where the use of a mechanical seal would either not be considered or present major technical challenges. Here are some unusual examples of how mechanical seals can be applied to solve problematic sealing tasks.

LATEX
Liquid synthetic latex is an emulsion of polymer particles suspended in an aqueous solution. It is used in making coatings, glues and gloves and more.

Sealing latex has historically been a problem for mechanical seals because it solidifies when exposed to either heat or friction (shear). When latex is exposed to heat, water separates from the polymer particles leading to solidification or coagulation. A more challenging issue with sealing liquid latex is that when it enters the gap between the mechanical seal faces, it gets sheared which also leads to local coagulation.

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A User’s Guide to Expansion Joint Control Units

It is no secret that one of the greatest demands for an expansion joint is the expectation to serve a long, leak-free life with little to no maintenance. Once installed, these flexible rubber connectors should require little attention. The preservation of this investment (and one’s sanity) can be maximized with an in-depth overview of how control units can prevent a new expansion joint from being overstressed.

The purpose of a control unit is to act as a safety device against excessive movement resulting from pressure thrust. A typical control unit assembly is comprised of threaded rods, steel gusset plates, nuts and washers.

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Using IoT to Improve Mechanical Seal Reliability

The Internet of Things (IoT) is a phrase in the limelight. The concept of IoT is extremely appealing, in all forms, to commercial industry. The technology of IoT has been implemented in various industries globally and it is finally approaching the rotating equipment industry.

To fully explain and understand how IoT technology can be implemented to increase mechanical seal reliability, a description of maintenance philosophies is needed. There are three main types of maintenance philosophies in industry today: reactive, preventative and predictive. Currently in the pump industry, and more specifically with mechanical seals, most of the maintenance is either in the reactive or preventative ideologies.

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A Guide to Elastomer Technology in Mechanical Seals

Elastomers (or rubbers) are a ubiquitous family of materials whose use stretches across nearly the entire range of mechanical seal designs. From plant-sourced natural rubber, so named by John Priestly in 1770 for its utility in rubbing away pencil graphite, to petroleum-sourced synthetic rubber first developed around the turn of the 20th century, elastomers and their properties are familiar but should not be overlooked – especially when dealing with mechanical seals.

Rubber seals come in a variety of profiles – O-rings, cup gaskets, bellows diaphragms, sealing/wiper lips and many others. They are classified as either static or dynamic and create positive pressure against surfaces to eliminate or control the leakage of liquids and/or gases while preventing the entrance of external contaminants such as dust and dirt.

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How to Investigate Compression Packing Failure Modes

In many respects, troubleshooting and failure analysis of packing materials is similar to the investigation of a crime scene. A good investigator knows how to gather clues from many different sources and put them together to understand what has happened. A good troubleshooter uses the same information gathering method, familiarizing themselves with the sealing materials, the process equipment and the systems where they are used.

The troubleshooter should seek information from the people who work with the equipment on a regular basis. Seal installers, maintenance personnel, operators, process engineers and others can all shed light on potential causes of failure.

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The Importance of Using Thread Lubricants in Bolted Connections

Would you run your automobile engine without oil? Assembling a bolted joint without using a proper thread lubricant is a comparable scenario. Thread lubricants are often overlooked but can have a huge impact on the success of a bolted joint.

In any industrial plant, there can be thousands of bolted connections, primarily in the flanged connections throughout piping systems, on packed stuffing boxes on pumps and valves, and on heat exchanger covers, for example. All of these pieces of equipment are used to join components while maintaining a leak tight pressure boundary for a system.

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FSA Announces their 2019 Annual Meeting

The Fluid Sealing Association has announced that their 2019 Annual Meeting will be held on October 21-25, 2019, at the Marriott City Center in Pittsburgh, PA. This meeting will be co-located once again with the Hydraulic Institute. If you are interested in attending, please email hope@mmco1.com to receive information when it is available early next summer.

FSA Divisions to Meet in Montreal on October 24, 2018

The Fluid Sealing Association’s Divisions will be meeting at the Hotel William Gray in Montreal on October 24, 2018. Here are some of their discussion topics.

The Compression Packing Division will discuss upcoming educational opportunities and the division’s strategic plan. The division’s technical committee will also review their activities.

The Gasket Division will hear an update on the SWG testing standard and will review trainings and webinars.

The Expansion Joint Division will hear updates from the Ducting technical committee and the Piping technical committee.

The Mechanical Seals Division will discuss KnowledgeBase content and functionality and industry standards, as well as progress on the Pump LCC.

FSA’s Technical Director will give a review of the highlights of his activities at the general session being held on Tuesday, October 23.

FSA Committees to Meet in Montreal on October 23, 2018

The FSA committees will meet at the Hotel William Gray in Montreal on October 23, 2018. Here’s what they will be talking about.

The Government Affairs Committee will keep FSA members informed on the latest information on Methane Rule in Canada and Mexico, as well as tariffs and the mechanical seal pipeline standard from API 682.

The Marketing Committee will discuss promotion of the FSA’s KnowledgeBase and the FSA’s participation in trade shows, social media activities, and partnering with the FSA’s media partners.

The Membership Committee will review the list of member prospects and the possibility of a new social meeting registration fee.

The Program and Locations Committee will discuss the schedule for 2019′s annual meeting, being held on October 21-25, 2019, at the Marriott City Center in Pittsburgh, PA. This meeting will be co-located with the Hydraulic Institute.

The Technical Coordinating Committee will review all of the division’s technical activities and the possibilities for cross-divisional activities in the coming year.